Ruru Kai

Indian American, leitlun ih thuthang mak danglam thleice ih ngan theu, canganthiam hminthang Fareed Zakaria cu a hnatuan rero lainak TIME le CNN pawl cun an ban ter.

Fareed Zakaria hi Mumbai, India ram ah  ni 24, kum 1964 ah a suak, Sunday Times of India ah editor a rak si theu, Fatima Zakaria fapa a si.  Journalism lam ih a tuan that ngaingai ruangah India ram cozah cun Padma Bhushan (Sunlawihnak) cu 2010 ah a rak pe dah. Harvard University ihsin  Political Science a ngah hnu ah Ph.D zirsuak a si.

Canganthiam le interview tuah thiamzet asi ruangah mipi cun a thu nganmi pawl hi siar nuam le hna van nak tiin an sim theu. Asinan,  August 20 ah TIME ih Magazine an suah mi thotho ah midang ih ngan cia mi amai irawmsuak bangih nganmi TIME ah a suah lawng siloin CNN ih amah bulpak blog ah a tar an kaih ngah ruangah a hnatuan ihsin zamrangten cawlh ter asi.

Sikhalsehla, Fareed Zakaria cun midang ca a ruk mi hi ka ru lo tiah phah lo ten a thil tuah diklo mi parah TIME Magazine lam pawl khal ngaithiam a dil ih ka ti dik lo ngaingai a si tiah ngaithiam a dil. Cuvek thotho in CNN lam khalah ban ter thotho a si ruangah a diklonak hi ngaithiam dingah zangfah a dil. TIME le CNN cun an cawl tir phawt ih ziangtin kan  an feh pi ding ti an rel rero laifang cu a si. A ca ruk mi hi Jill Lepore in April 2012 ah New York Time ih rak ngan zo mi a si.

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“We have reviewed Fareed Zakaria’s TIME column, for which he has apologized,” the statement said. “He wrote a shorter blog post on CNN.com on the same issue which included similar unattributed excerpts. That blog post has been removed and CNN has suspended Fareed Zakaria while this matter is under review.” — CNN

“Media reporters have pointed out that paragraphs in my Time column this week bear close similarities to paragraphs in Jill Lepore’s essay in the April 23rd issue of the New Yorker. They are right. I made a terrible mistake. It is a serious lapse and one that is entirely my fault.” — Fareed Zakaria

Zakaria ih ruk mi cahmai
:

Adam Winkler, a professor of constitutional law at UCLA, documents the actual history in Gunfight: The Battle over the Right to Bear Arms in America. Guns were regulated in the U.S. from the earliest years of the Republic. Laws that banned the carrying of concealed weapons were passed in Kentucky and Louisiana in 1813. Other states soon followed: Indiana in 1820, Tennessee and Virginia in 1838, Alabama in 1839 and Ohio in 1859. Similar laws were passed in Texas, Florida and Oklahoma. As the governor of Texas (Texas!) explained in 1893, the “mission of the concealed deadly weapon is murder. To check it is the duty of every self-respecting, law-abiding man.

Lepore ih rak ngan dan cu:

As Adam Winkler, a constitutional-law scholar at U.C.L.A., demonstrates in a remarkably nuanced new book, “Gunfight: The Battle Over the Right to Bear Arms in America,” firearms have been regulated in the United States from the start. Laws banning the carrying of concealed weapons were passed in Kentucky and Louisiana in 1813, and other states soon followed: Indiana (1820), Tennessee and Virginia (1838), Alabama (1839), and Ohio (1859). Similar laws were passed in Texas, Florida, and Oklahoma. As the governor of Texas explained in 1893, the “mission of the concealed deadly weapon is murder. To check it is the duty of every self-respecting, law-abiding man.

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